Joy Kogawa House 2011 Writing for Social Change readings series

Historic Joy Kogawa House is pleased to announce Toronto author Susan Crean as our 2011 writer-in-residence.

Susan Crean is a lifelong non-fiction author and journalist who will live at Historic Joy Kogawa House while working on a major new book of literary non-fiction that combines memoir, history, and social comment to tell the story, in part, of head-tax payer, Wong Dong Wong, who came to Canada in 1911. Crean will live and work at the house for three months while creating this new work. During this period, she will offer local writers and readers a number of opportunities to meet with her as an author in one-on-one consultations.

Crean will also engage in a series of conversations during her residency with writers who use their work as a means of social change. Writers in this series include the following:
Poet Evelyn Lau, in conversation Sunday, October 2
Journalist Eric Enno Tamm, Sunday, October 16
Playwright Tara Beagan, Sunday, October 30
Essayist Betsy Warland, Sunday, November 5
Writer Wayde Compton, Sunday, November 27
Artist Shirley Bear, Sunday, December 4

Crean will also lead writing workshops from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, October 29, and Saturday, November 19, and she will participate in a craft sale and open house event with local writers from 1 to 5 p.m. on Sunday, December 11.

Crean is an accomplished teacher and editor and her ability to work with other writers distinguished her application from others received in a cross-Canada call for proposals. Among the applicants received, Susan Crean was judged the most skilled writer and the applicant with the most clarity around the public programs to be presented. Crean lives in Toronto, Ontario, but will live and work at Historic Joy Kogawa House throughout her residency, from September 15 to December 15, 2011.

To make an appointment for consultation with Susan Crean, and for further information, please visit www.kogawahouse.com or call (604) 263-6586.

From Bonnie Nish
www.pandorascollective.com

Susan Crean invites submissions on Toronto

Introducing… a website for a book I have yet to write.

The book is about Toronto, as you know. And the website, which is a collaboration with Patrick Davidson, is designed as a means for me to talk to people about the City. By sharing excerpts from interviews I’ve been doing, and by eliciting comments and contributions from others.

When I was sent on a publicity tour across Canada with my book on Emily Carr, I was thunderstruck by the stories and anecdotes people in the audience came up with. There lay a gold mine of material, I marvelled. And that prompted me to think I should perhaps have done the tour before writing the book.

www.whatistoronto.ca is my attempt to do the tour before writing the book — to invite participation in the project from people I don`t know. And those who I do know.

I’d love to know what you think of the site. So take a look. Leave a comment. Pass it on.
http://www.whatistoronto.ca/

Susan Crean, Author
screan@sympatico.ca
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Fauzia Rafique’s novel ‘Skeena’ to be launched in English and Punjabi

Vancouver Lower Mainland writer Fauzia Rafique’s novel ‘Skeena’ will be launched in English and Punjabi in Surrey and Vancouver on April 9 and April 10 at 2-4 PM. View event information:
Punjabi Gurumukhi and Shahmukhi editions, Surrey April 9
English edition, Vancouver April 10

‘Skeena is the story of a Muslim Canadian woman spanning thirty years of her life where she explores her changing environments, religious and cultural influences, and intimate relationships. Told by Skeena herself, it is a rare glimpse into the mind and perspectives of a Muslim woman. With the utter simplicity of style and expression, and a plot immersed in gripping realities, Fauzia has created a novel that is hard to put down even when it explodes some deep-rooted myths.’ (Libros Libertad 2011)

From a Punjabi village, ‘Skeena’ takes us to Lahore city, Toronto Ontario, and then Surrey in British Columbia.

For more information on ‘Skeena’
novelskeena.wordpress.com
To order ‘Skeena’ Online
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‘Secure Footing in a Changing Literary Landscape’ symposium by TWUC

The Writers’ Union of Canada (TWUC) is offering the Professional Development Symposium “Secure Footing in a Changing Literary Landscape” in Toronto, St. John’s, Montreal, Ottawa, Regina, Calgary, Vancouver and Victoria, in February and March of 2011.

The symposiums take place from 9:30 am to 4:30 pm.

Vancouver
March 10, 2011
Simon Fraser University
Earl & Jennie Lohn Policy Room, Rm 7000
515 West Hastings Street

Even if you have attended a Writers’ Union of Canada workshop in the past, you won’t want to miss this exciting new day-long exploration of the changing literary landscape.

Authors Betsy Warland and Ross Laird will illuminate the new landscape of digital literature and publishing and discuss its impact on traditional modes of creation. Kelly Duffin, the Union’s executive director, will discuss authors’ contracts in the digital age.

This full-day event is designed to address the creative and financial questions that arise as writers navigate print-based and digital literary landscapes. The symposium also explores the importance of community and the need for writers to develop their own writing community.

Most workshops of this calibre charge hundreds of dollars. The price of this symposium is $75.00 and covers costs, including lunch.

For registration information on the city and date closest to you please go to www.writersunion.ca/registration.pdf.

Space is limited so register today.

The Writers’ Union of Canada acknowledges the financial support of the government of Canada for this project through the Book Publishing industry Development Program.

Many thanks for your time and attention.

Valerie Laws
Office Administrator
The Writers’ Union of Canada
416-703-8982 x 224
200 – 90 Richmond Street East
Toronto ON M5C 1P1
info@writersunion.ca
www.writersunion.ca
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Okavango: An African Orchestra

On February 25, 2011 at 8:00 PM

CONGRATULATIONS TO PASIPAMIRE
A Vancouver musician.

Okavango: An African Orchestra is an ambitious new musical project that could happen only in one of the world’s great multicultural cities: Toronto. Batuki Music Society Artistic Director Nadine McNulty has assembled a cast of seven accomplished African-born musicians who now live in Toronto and Montreal: Daniel Nebiat (Eritrean Krar), Pasipamire Gunguwo (Zimbabwean marimba/mbira), Donne Roberts (Malagasy guitarist), Nuudi Kooshin (Somali kaban), Waleed Abdulhamid (Sudanese bass/guembri), Sadio Sissokho (Senegalese kora) and Walter MacLean (Ghanaian percussion).

The orchestra takes its name from the Okavango Delta, a basin in the Kalahari Desert in Botswana, where many different animal species come together to feed and find water. Predators and prey are forced to coexist and share the meager resources because of the harsh environment around them. Similarly, Okavango: An African Orchestra brings together the traditional music and instruments of several major African cultures that historically have had little or no interaction. The musicians of Okavango have created a common meeting place for these disparate cultures, and a new musical language that harmonizes their different tuning systems, rhythms, and timbres. The multicultural spirit of modern-day Canada bridges ancient African solitudes.

The concert program will feature 5 traditional songs from the various African musical cultures represented, plus the world premiere of Okavango: A Conversation with the Spirits: a suite of 5 new, CBC Radio-commissioned pieces by members of Okavango: An African Orchestra.

Admission: $25

www.batukimusic.com
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