Booklaunch: ‘Matriarchy’ and ‘The Second Advent of Zeus’

matriarchy-poster3

Launching two books of poetry
‘The Second Advent of Zeus’ poetry collection by Manolis
&
‘Matriarchy’ chapbook by Tiesa Leudy, Ayesha Durrani, Mariam Zohra, Fauzia Rafique, Zohra Begum

Sunday, January 15th, 4-6pm
Media Room, Upstairs, The Lodge Building.
Alexandra Neighborhood House
2916 McBride Ave, Surrey
alexhouse.net

Hosted by
Virginia Gillespie
Poetry Readings
Manolis
Tiesa Leudy
Mariam Zohra
Fauzia Rafique

We will also take this opportunity to introduce the new Word Arts LIVE Series being launched February 26 at this venue by Host Virginia Gillespie in collaboration with Surrey Muse At Large (SMAL).

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‘Clear-eyed warrior friend. (gracias a la vida)’ by Sana Janjua

sana-2017in wilderness of solitude

people intellectualize: exile, poverty, torture. my friend doesn’t. for years on end, there is no sharing of personal stories that may have caused tears. in the piece i am posting below, she writes, “tears are irrelevant in this place”, when in her company i sob, incessantly, as afghanistan’s farkhanda is murdered, syria’s kurdi washes up on the coast, pakistan’s taseer takes the bullet. there are times when i just know i have to go to her, and she listens, often without looking at me.

cathartic writing is de facto primal, fauzia has always said to me, and crying adheres only to the beginning of the process of writing. crying, she doesn’t denounce, but sees as part of the process, seminal but not central. there are many people who cry as they write, and every word causes a downpour of the big wave. post-crying, the swarm of bees, references of personal associations with the subject, clear; clarity sets in; a poem/story takes off. i don’t understand what she means; i just respond to the emotion, and the sense of justice it is tied to.

then, here and there: a few stories appear: personal political, or political personal. through the apertures, i learn a thing or two about the exile, the torture, and the poverty. bereft of the lived experience, i contemplate what such terms we host in the often too intellectualized spaces really mean, and can’t get past the “factory-farmed” meanings. yet, there is no crying, just ongoing solidarity with those who we pathologize, and take pictures of, often without asking, to adorn our own sense of charity. surrey muse is un-funded, singularly imagined to create spaces for all kinds of people, especially those who don’t have a space to go to, and this is her vision; the rest of us founding members haven’t found another working formula to wrestle white privilege, and structural ghettoization* of writers of color, especially the ones fighting for the means to move to the end, any end: a small chapbook, self-published, with one’s name entering an imagined canon of sorts.

she writes, in 2015, an autobiographical story about her love for flowers, in telling a tale that is otherwise seeped in the history of violence against the people of color, and the treatment refugees receive in canada, which she ends with a comparison between herself, and a minority in Pakistan/a black man in the US/an Aboriginal female in Canada. yet again, she doesn’t cry for herself, or for others for that matter. here too, the stress is on the struggles of other people: a comparison that hierarchically puts her in a place of power, invisibilizing her own struggles, at once cognizant of her own privilege of what she can do and another can’t.

how can you cry when you write a poem on blasphemy?
or white supremacy? or religious extremism? or the duress which silences, shames, strips us of dignity? you just reveal your small brown frame, and say: i am here, like farkhanda, writing from the niche i created myself, standing amidst the surveillance points, thinking past the hallucinatory states, in clear-eyed solidarity.

i am so proud of my friend. i love her. and, i love the work she does. silently.

The link to her post:
Memory Wall on the Strip: a Mirror for the Officials of the City of Surrey

*(forgive me, if you are sensitive about the term, and see it in the exclusive framing of the african american people’s struggles, but this post is in solidarity with those struggles, and accept my gratitude for seeing it that way.)

From Sana’s facebook timeline, December 31st, 23:06.
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Fauzia Rafique – Readings at Kogawa House – Van Nov 13

Sunday November 13
2-4pm
Kogawa House
1450 64 Avenue West

South Asian Canadian author
Fauzia Rafique
Will present readings from her
Novel ‘Skeena’ (Libros Libertad 2011)
Novel ‘Triple’ (Unpublished ms)
Poems from ‘Passion Fruit/Tahnget Phal’ (Uddari Books 2011)

With Susan Crean and Tariq Malik

Discussion
Refreshments

Fauzia Rafique: Fauzia Rafique’s long-awaited novel Skeena was published in Punjabi in Pakistan in 2007, and in Canada last Spring. It is the story of a Muslim Canadian woman, written in Skeena’s own voice, which follows her journey from village to Lahore, to Toronto and finally Surrey. View Fauzia’s page: http://gandholi.wordpress.com/

Susan Crean is working on a book exploring Chinese Canadian communities through someone she knew as a child. Susan has written and edited many works of non fiction. One of her books ‘The Laughing One: A Journey to Emily Carr’ was short-listed for the 2001 Governor General’s Award for non fiction. In 2002, the title won the BC Book Prize for Non fiction. More at: www.susancrean.ca

Tariq Malik, a member of the Kogawa House Board who has recently launched his book ‘Chanting Denied Shores: The Komagatamaru Narratives‘, will also present from his work. He had earlier published ‘The Rainsongs of Kotli’.

About the events at Kogawa House:
Up-coming Events at Kogawa House‏ – Vancouver Sundays Nov-Dec

To reserve a seat
kogawahouse@yahoo.ca

Visit: http://www.kogawahouse.com/.
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Betsy Warland at Kogawa House – Vancouver Nov 6 at 2-4pm‏

I am hosting two wonderful women writers over the next two Sundays and hope you can join us. Betsy Warland this week, and Fauzia Rafique next.

Betsy Warland: Poet, author and editor, Betsy Warland has been writing on the cutting edge of feminist literature and active in the feminist writing community for thirty years. Her poetry, and latterly her non-fiction, push the boundaries of genre while challenging the assumptions of culture. A mentor to many, she is currently director of The Writer’s Studio at SFU.

Fauzia Rafique: Fauzia Rafique’s long-awaited novel, Skeena, was published in Punjabi in Pakistan in 2007, and in Canada last Spring. It is the story of a Muslim Canadian woman, written in Skeena’s own voice, which follows her journey from village to Lahore, to Toronto and finally Surrey. Author Tariq Malik, a member of Kogawa House Board, will host the event with me.

Susan Crean
Kogawa House
1450 West 64th Ave @ Granville

To reserve a seat email kogawahouse@yahoo.ca

Blogging at www.susancrean.ca
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Up-coming Events at Kogawa House‏ – Vancouver Sundays Nov-Dec

On Sundays from 2pm – 4pm
I will be hosting writers at Kogawa House. Some are writers I know, some I’ve invited to get to know. All of them are artists I admire, and think you will too. So join me here.
Kogawa House
1450 W. 64th Ave @ Granville

To reserve a seat email kogawahouse@yahoo.ca 
Blogging at www.susancrean.ca

TaraBeaganTara Beagan is a multi-talented and prolific young theatre artist, best known for her plays which have won numerous awards and nominations. A “proud halfbreed of Ntlakapamux (Thompson River Salish) and Irish Canadian heritage”, she is part of the new generation of Native artists creating ambitious work that is edgy, funny and very smart. Tara is currently artistic director of Native Earth Performing Arts, the oldest professional Aboriginal performing arts company in Canada. Sunday, October 30th

Betsy WarlandPoet, author and editor, Besty Warland has been writing on the cutting edge of feminist literature, and active in the feminist writing community for thirty years. Her poetry, and latterly her non-fiction, push the boundaries of genre and challenge the assumptions of culture. A mentor to many, Betsy is currently director of the Writer’s Studio at SFU. Sunday, November 6th.

Fauzia Rafique Fauzia’s long-awaited novel, Skeena, was published in Punjabi in Pakistan in 2007, and in Canada last Spring. It is the story of a Muslim Canadian woman, written in Skeena’s own voice, which follows her journey from village, to Lahore, to Toronto and, finally, Surrey. Novelist Tariq Malik, a member of the Kogawa House Board, will host the event with me. Sunday, November 13th

Joy Kogawa – Book Launch Sheena Wilson launches her collection of essays on the life and work of Joy Kogawa, Joy Kogawa, Essays on Her Works (Guernica). Wilson has contributed three articles and an extensive Kogawa bibliography to the book. Several of the writers will be present, as will Joy Kogawa. Sunday, November 20th.

Wayde Compton Wayde Compton is a well-known writer and activist who is currently the writer-in-residence at the Vancouver Public Library. He is an experimental poet (49th Parallel Psalm, Performance Bond), a DJ, who branched into non-fiction in his most recent book After Canaan: Essays on Race, Writing and Region. His work is deeply imbued with history and music. Sunday, November 27th.

Shirley BearMaliseet visual artist and writer Shirley Bear is from the Tobique reserve in New Brunswick. Her work is in many collections and in 2009 the Beaverbrook Art Gallery mounted a retrospective of her work. She is who also a writer who blurs the genres, and her book Virgin Bones – Belayak Kcikug’nas’ikn’ug, combines story, poetry, and prose. Shirley lived in Vancouver through the 1990s and was the Aboriginal Advisor at Emily Carr College. Sunday, December 4th.

To reserve a seat email:
kogawahouse@yahoo.ca

From Susan Crean
screan@sympatico.ca
Blogging at www.susancrean.ca
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